President’s Message

Our April meeting and luncheon were well attended.  Many thanks to Tucker Grant and Lee Truman for getting us the Black Walnut for the raffle.  The lucky ones  were well rewarded, and the CIW put a few dollars into its treasury.

The winner of the Toro Challenge, by popular acclaim was Ron Lindsay who turned a beautiful goblet in the supplied White Oak.

John Beaver amused and impressed us with a presentation of his works showing many clever designs incorporating his signature Wave theme.  The designs are realized by separating and reassembling components of a bowl in different combinations.   Most of those who attended expressed interest in inviting him back for a full day demonstration, now scheduled for November.  This demo will be focused on the “how to” which he has not discussed with us yet.

I was not present during the show and tell, because of an urgent trip back to my house to collect the projector needed for John Beaver’s presentation.   Thanks to those who kept the meeting going during my absence.

At this month’s meeting May 21 at Cabrillo Middle School, we will have a full day (9:00 am to 4:00 pm) demonstration by David Springett.  David is famous for the wizardry he employs while achieving intricate forms.  We expect fast moving demonstrations of several projects, combined with an excellent sense of humor and very worthwhile instruction.

One project from Springett’s presentation will be chosen for the “Toro Challenge” to be judged during our June meeting.  It should be very instructive and a lot of fun.

Please contact RonaldBLindsay@verizon.net  to inform him of your plan to attend, so we can make proper arrangements.  The fee for members is $35.00 including lunch and drinks.  Please mail your checks to: Ron Lindsay, 1795 Lyndhurst Ave., Camarillo, CA 93010

I’ll see you at the meeting,

Pedro

For photos of the April meeting including the John Beaver talk, the Show and Tell, and the Goblet Challenge, see the page for the April Meeting.  Pictures of John Beaver’s work may also be found at www.johnbeaver.net.

 

Mentors AvailableThe following list of members have offered to act as mentors to any member of the club who wishes to have hands-on instruction.  This can be done at the mentor’s shop or at the member’s home on their own lathe.  It is an excellent way for beginning turners to quickly learn basic skills and safety and for more advanced turners to develop new ideas and skills.  Using your member roster, give any mentor a call to arrange a time.  If you don’t have your roster or want to add your name to the mentor list, give the newsletter editor a call.

Each mentor can teach basic skills; some have also listed specific topics in which they are especially interested or have more advanced skills.

Bruce Berger         Any topic including segmented turning

Warren Brown       Any topic

David Frank            Any topic

Al Geller                   Open form bowls, natural edge bowls, bowl design

Ron Lindsay           Any topic including hollow turning freehand

Jim Rinde                Anything to do with using and turning resins, turning goblets, hollow turning with a boring bar with/without a laser

Herm Ross              Miniatures; tool making and metal work

Chuck Stevenson Basic turning; he is learning to do segmental work

Gary Toro                Anything you want to make

Sam Turner             Any topic (if he doesn’t know how, he will learn it with you)

Turning(s) of the MonthThe winner selected among many worthy candidates this month is Rick Haseman with his inlaid goblets.

Rick writes: I selected 3x3x12” blanks (two Osage Orange and one Canarywood); glued the blanks to a waste piece on a face plate after sawing off to about seven inches.

 

I turned a cylinder, then brought to a jig made for my drill press and drilled fourteen ½-inch holes.  Made Bloodwood plugs with plug cutters in drill press, and glued them in using thin epoxy. (West System).  Then back to the lathe after trimming excess plugs on the band saw.  I tried to get a roughing out of the desired outside shape of the cup portion without getting too small a diameter and weakening the blank.

 

Then the inside is hollowed out followed by finishing the outside of the cup and finally doing the stem. With the three different goblets I made so far I have varied the order of doing inside and outside a little bit. On two of them I used a steady rest to aid in support of an already shaped outside, while finishing the inside. This allowed me to get a much thinner wall thickness on the Canarywood goblet as compared to my first attempt with the Osage Orange. Insides were all finished with the West epoxy, while the outsides were done with wipe-on poly which lets the wood show much better, I believe.Fixtures for drilling holes in goblets

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Questions and Answers (Q&A)

This is a regular feature of the monthly Newsletter.  Send your questions to the newsletter editor, Ron Lindsay,RonaldBLindsay@verizon.net .  He will forward each question to our panel of experts.  We will get answers to each question from at least two of our experts and publish them in a future newsletter in this Q&A section.

Question: No questions this month

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